APS and Driving

Many APS patients are concerned about their safety to drive and whether they need to declare their condition to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA).

Despite the DVLA listing a vast number of health conditions that you have to declare, antiphospholipid syndrome is not included. We have listed here the possible conditions the DVLA recognises which can arise from having APS and what you need to do:

  • Blood clots
  • Cognitive problems
  • Dizziness/Vertigo
  • Heart attack
  • Heart valve disease or replacement valve
  • Kidney problems
  • Memory problems (severe)
  • Seizures
  • Stroke
  • Mini-stroke/Transient Ischaemic Attack (TIA)

Please remember that the law requires you to tell the DVLA about any condition that may affect your ability to drive safely. If you are involved in an accident and it is found that your health condition was a contributing factor, you may be prosecuted and your insurance may not be valid.

Blood clots and driving

If you hold any type of vehicle licence, you will not need to tell the DVLA that you have had a blood clot in the limbs (Deep Vein Thrombosis) or lung (Pulmonary Embolism).

Cognitive problems and driving

If you hold any type of vehicle licence, you will need to tell the DVLA that you have cognitive problems. Please visit the GOV.UK website and download the questionnaire FEP1.

Dizziness and driving

If you hold any type of vehicle licence, you will need to tell the DVLA that you suffer from dizziness or vertigo. Please visit the GOV.UK website and download the questionnaire FEP1.

Heart attack and driving

If you have a car or motorcycle licence, you will not need to tell the DVLA you have had a heart attack. However, you should stop driving for at least one month and only restart when your doctor tells you it is safe to do so. Anyone with a bus, coach or lorry licence will automatically have to inform the DVLA.

Heart valve disease and driving

If you have a car or motorcycle licence, you will not need to tell the DVLA you have heart valve problems. Anyone with a bus, coach or lorry licence will automatically have to inform the DVLA.

Kidney problems and driving

If you have a car or motorcycle licence, you will not need to tell the DVLA you have kidney problems. Anyone with a bus, coach or lorry licence will automatically have to inform the DVLA.

Memory problems (severe) and driving

If you hold any type of vehicle licence, you will need to tell the DVLA that you suffer from severe memory problems. Please visit the GOV.UK website and download the questionnaire FEP1.

Seizures and driving

If you have experienced seizures, you will need to let the DVLA know – this applies to all licence holders. Please visit the GOV.UK website and download the questionnaire FEP1.

Stroke and driving

If you have a car or motorcycle licence and are not suffering from any residual problems after a month from having your stroke, you will not need to tell the DVLA about your medical condition. However, if you are still experiencing problems, then you will need to let them know. Please visit the GOV.UK website and download questionnaire STR1. Anyone with a bus, coach or lorry licence will automatically have to inform the DVLA.

Transient Ischaemic Attacks (TIAs) and driving

If you have a car or motorcycle licence, you will not need to tell the DVLA that you have had a TIA. However, you should stop driving for at least one month and only restart when your doctor tells you it is safe to do so. Anyone with a bus, coach or lorry licence will automatically have to inform the DVLA